By continuing to use our site, you consent to using cookies. We use cookies to improve your experience on our site and to show you content that is relevant and helpful. To find out more, read our updated privacy policy.

Upper School Academic Departments

Modern and Classical Languages

The mission of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages is to encourage students to see themselves as citizens of the world and to embrace a global view. In all Modern Language classes, we focus on using the language in authentic and meaningful situations, incorporating and practicing the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The courses progress in difficulty, with topical contexts, from the expression of basic needs and desires to the discussion of complex topics in the upper levels. Our pedagogy is guided by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) recommendations for creating an immersive language learning experience. In the Latin courses, we emphasize reading, translation, grammar, vocabulary, and derivatives. Students of Latin learn to read ancient authors while studying Roman history and Classical mythology. 
*Please refer tog raduation requirements and policies for level advancement.
  • Chinese Language and Culture I Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Chinese I offers a robust entry to the Chinese language and culture. Anchored by the superior ACTFL Chinese textbook series, HuanYing, students are steeped right from the start in an eclectic, multi-pronged introduction that is fun, engaging, and highly practical. Rhymes, tongue-twisters, poems, videos, and annotated audio are among the curricular enhancements that boost vocabulary, engage interest, and maximize student use of the target language. Task-based communication is emphasized from the start, with students learning to introduce others, describe school, and ask fundamental questions. Students are given Skritter accounts to master characters, while they are also introduced to the historical and culturally significant idioms that permeate the language and open windows on the culture. With a pedagogical approach created by a native speaker of both English and Chinese, the course is uniquely tailored to the needs of American students learning Chinese for the first time.
  • Chinese Language and Culture II Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture I and/or departmental approval Chinese II is an exciting course as it represents an expansive organic outgrowth from the foundation established in Chinese I. Students begin to explore additional methods of communication, including typing using the pinyin romanization system. They learn to format letters and emails, describe their schedule in detail, discuss Chinese cities and their characteristics, among many other key topics. Presentational speaking is a focus, with students learning to explain Chinese idioms to one another, using circumlocutions to explain vocabulary, including its cultural relevance. Classroom learning is supplemented with field trips, and beginning in sophomore year students become eligible to apply for the Saints Go Global China trip.
  • Chinese Language and Culture III Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture II and/or departmental approval Chinese III is a special course, in that students truly begin to develop an independence to their language study that can carry them not only through collegiate studies but to a post-college career of lifelong learning. The philosophy of the course is that language study is a lifelong and rewarding endeavor, and that students should develop the interest, independence, and skills necessary to develop themselves as far as they wish. Students are taught to use the dictionary, and deeply research the language using a plethora of paper and online resources. In addition to continuing with HuanYing, we also supplement the curriculum with annotated bits of classic films. The expectation is that students leaving Chinese III have a strong ear for a variety of voices and accents, and that they can communicate comprehensively on pragmatic topics.
  • Chinese Language and Culture IV Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture III and/or departmental approval Chinese IV picks up where Chinese III leaves off, investigating more deeply the various styles in which Chinese is used across different media. In Chinese IV, students begin a more rigorous study of Chinese as it is used in newspapers, film, and music, and begin to explore several of the AP Chinese Language and Culture themes. We also begin to look closely at the difficult task of translation, involving such complex questions as the translation of secondary associations, tone, metaphor, and nuance. Students thus gain a new and unique insight into Chinese culture as it manifests in its language; whereas English is saturated with baseball and war metaphors, for instance, Chinese has its own set of routinely called upon symbols, allowing students to begin to reflect on the philosophical and political roots of the language and culture.
  • Chinese Language and Culture V Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture IV and/or departmental approval
    Chinese V Honors is conducted entirely in Chinese, and focuses on engaging with authentic materials at a sophisticated level. Content is grouped by theme, and students are encouraged within a thematic unit to pursue their own interests and find content that interests them. Such content may include, but is not limited to, newspaper articles, youtube videos, popular songs, etc. Class participation plays a major role in this course, as classroom conversation is conducted in the spirit of the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interviews, in which students are asked to remain on a topic and continually deepen the sophistication of the discussion as it proceeds.
  • French I - Foundations

    Full Year
    1 credit
    This introductory course is for beginners or those with a limited background in French. Students acquire a solid foundation in French vocabulary, grammar, and culture as they explore various Francophone countries. Students will develop and strengthen their four communication skills through a variety of activities, individual and group work, written work, projects, games, skits, presentations, and reading comprehension. The dynamic textbook T'es branché? 1 is supplemented by an audio program and online exercises. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate useful, everyday expressions that they can use in real life situations. This course is instructed predominantly in French.
  • French II

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: MS French 8 or French I
    This course develops and reinforces the four language skills of second year students as they review essential material from French I or Middle School French courses. Students explore the contextual cultural themes of health and wellness, sports, and leisure activities, with integrated grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking in the target language and thus gain vital listening and speaking skills. In addition to our text series, T’es branché? 2 students engage in a broad range of online French-language activities to improve their aural comprehension and deepen their knowledge of the French-speaking world. Emphasis is on reading comprehension, oral discussion, written expression, and cultural awareness.
  • French II Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: MS French 8 or French I and departmental approval
    This accelerated course offers further development of basic skills to students who have demonstrated a strong aptitude in the language. Increased proficiency is acquired through more extensive vocabulary building and expanded study of grammatical structure. Students continue to develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers in the target language. Emphasis is on new grammatical structures and vocabulary pertaining to cultural themes of health and wellness, sports, and leisure activities. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking only in the target language and thus gain vital listening and speaking skills. In addition to our text series, T’es branché? 2, students engage in a broad range of online French-language activities to improve their aural comprehension and deepen their knowledge of the French-speaking world.
  • French III

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: French II
    French III emphasizes the importance of using French effectively and authentically in a variety of situations. The course provides a stimulating program that explores topics such as personal relationships, the global environment, and FrancoAfrican art and culture, for example. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking in the target language to gain vital speaking and listening skills. Through the textbook’s online portal, Passport, students are able to access all levels of the textbook in the T’es branché? series, and a multitude of engaging and interactive content that fosters the students’ understanding of the language and culture represented by French-speaking countries.
  • French III Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: French II Honors and departmental approval
    In this accelerated course, students continue to develop and refine their proficiency in all four language skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—with an emphasis on students’ ability to communicate both orally and in writing. Conducted exclusively in French, students make use of the text series T’es branché? 3, which explores themes related to Francophone communities around the world, travel, cultural heritage, art and our society in evolution. Short stories, poetry (Prévert, Verlaine, La Fontaine), print/online media (TV5Monde, FranceTVInfo, Radio France Internationale), film (Diaboliques and La Gloire de Mon Père), and art serve as jumping-off points for discussion. Additionally, students read, act out, and listen to recordings of Suivez la Piste, a French detective thriller. As a culminating project, groups write, act in, and film their own detective iMovies.
  • French IV - Advanced Topics in the Francophone World

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: French III or French III Honors and departmental approval
    French IV offers students further development in core language skills as the class builds upon the grammatical and syntactical structures from French I-III, but emphasis is placed primarily on honing students’ listening and speaking skills. French IV students make use of the dynamic text series, T’es branché?, which explores themes related to francophone communities around the world, travel, cultural heritage, art and our society in evolution. Through a variety of sources (short stories, poetry, print and online media, film, radio, art), students acquire the vocabulary necessary to enhance communicative competence. Additionally, students read and act out scenes from Molière’s Tartuffe. Cultural projects center around Haiti and Normandy as many students in this class participate in our Haiti Mission Trip and/or our Normandy Exchange Program with the Lycée Jeanne d’Arc in the historic town of Bayeux, France.
  • French IV Honors - Francophone Literature

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: French III Honors and/or departmental approval
    This accelerated course refines students’ reading comprehension skills as they explore the works of Francophone writers from France, Africa, the Antilles, the Maghreb, and Canada. Students analyze major themes (class warfare, social injustice, tolerance, freedom, colonialism, and love and marriage) and learn to express abstract ideas both orally and in writing. The core reading list consists of Molière’s 17th century play, Tartuffe, as well as the 20th century play, Une Tempête, by Martiniquais playwright, Aimé Césaire. Students examine the Negritude Movement of 1930s Paris, led by Césaire and Senghor, Senegal’s first president. Vocabulary and grammatical points are presented and practiced in context throughout the year. Cultural projects center around Haiti and Normandy as many students in this class participate in our Haiti Mission Trip and/or our Normandy Exchange Program with the Lycée Jeanne d’Arc in the historic town of Bayeux, France.
  • AP French Language and Culture

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: French IV Francophone Literature Honors and/or departmental approval
    This advanced course is designed to train students in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational aspects of communication in French. The AP French Language and Culture course is organized by six cultural themes: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics. Emphasis is on advanced grammar topics, practice in narrative and expository writing, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and extemporaneous speaking. Students analyze, reflect on, and discuss contemporary issues throughout the French-speaking world. AP French Language students partake in the rich cultural offerings in the Washington, DC region such as field trips to exhibits at local museums as well as visiting the Embassy of Haiti. Students also promote the learning of French by visiting a local elementary school where they instruct a French lesson. This program prepares students for the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture examination (additional fee). Successful completion of this course requires significant outside work and diligent class preparation.
  • French V - Francophone Culture, Communities and Conversation

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: French IV, Honors Francophone Literature, or AP French Language and departmental approval
    This program is a fifth year class for French students whose goal is to exchange creatively and reflect in the French language. Since communication in a second language requires an understanding of the cultural context, our aim is to teach the living language as students “travel” to francophone countries and examine selected works (short stories, plays, films, music, art and online/print media). Conducted entirely in French, this course provides an opportunity for students to improve their speaking and listening skills and is designed to provide practical opportunities for vocabulary development. Grammatical lessons are integrated in response to student needs and objectives. Assessments include reflection papers written in class as well as presentations. Additional topics may include: the history of French Film (Lumière Brothers, Méliès, and the New Wave Movement) as well as Francophone Théâtre. Selections of content may be made to match student interests. Reflection, exchange, and creativity enhance participants’ experiences, and cultural projects center primarily around Francophone Africa.
  • Spanish I - Foundations

    Full Year
    1 credit
    This foundational course is for beginners or those with a limited background in Spanish. Students will develop a solid foundation in vocabulary, grammar, and culture as they explore the rich heritage of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will develop and strengthen proficiency in the four skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking through a variety of activities and assessments that include individual and group work, projects, games, skits, and presentations. The text series, ¡Qué Chévere!, provides students with a wide range of engaging and interactive online content that includes supplemental readers, exciting cultural videos, and access to all levels of the text series. Students will finish the year with confidence in their proficiency and a deeper understanding of the richness of the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Spanish II

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: MS Spanish 8 or Spanish I
    This course develops and reinforces the four language skills of second-year students as they review essential material from Spanish I or Middle School Spanish courses. Students explore the contextual cultural themes of health and wellness, sports, and leisure activities, with integrated grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking in the target language and thus gain vital listening and speaking skills. In addition to our text series, ¡Qué Chévere! 2, students engage in a broad range of online Spanish-language activities to improve their oral comprehension and deepen their knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis is on reading comprehension, oral discussion, written expression, and cultural awareness.
  • Spanish II Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: MS Spanish 8 or Spanish I and departmental approval
    This accelerated course offers further development of basic skills to students who have demonstrated a strong aptitude in the language. Increased proficiency is acquired through more extensive vocabulary building and expanded study of grammatical structure. Students continue to develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers in the target language. Emphasis is on new grammatical structures and vocabulary pertaining to cultural themes of health and wellness, sports, and leisure activities. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking only in the target language and thus gain vital listening and speaking skills. In addition to our text series, ¡Qué Chévere! 2, students engage in a broad range of online Spanish-language activities to improve their aural comprehension and deepen their knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Spanish III

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Spanish II
    Spanish III emphasizes the importance of using Spanish effectively and authentically in a variety of situations. The course provides a stimulating program that explores topics such as personal relationships, how teenagers communicate, and the environment. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking in the target language to gain vital speaking and listening skills. Students also read fiction and non-fiction books in the target language that allow them to explore grammar and cultural topics in an engaging way. Additionally, the course’s textbook, ¡Qué Chévere! 3, provides a multitude of engaging and interactive content that fosters the students’ understanding of the language and culture represented by Spanish-speaking countries.
  • Spanish III Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: Spanish II Honors and/or departmental approval
    This course is for strong, committed students who have demonstrated superior dedication and ability in Spanish. Like Spanish III, the Spanish Honors course uses the dynamic ¡Qué Chévere! 3 text and online series and students learn to use Spanish effectively and authentically in a variety of situations, both written and spoken, while embarking on a deeper study of grammar as well as presentational writing and speaking. The course provides a stimulating program that explores topics including personal relationships, culture, and the environment. Students focus on their communicative competence by speaking exclusively in the target language to gain vital listening and speaking skills.
  • Spanish IV - Exploration of Latin American and Spanish Cultures

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Spanish III or Spanish III Honors and/or departmental approval 
    This course is for students who have successfully completed their language requirement and wish to continue their study of the Spanish language and Hispanic culture and history. It is designed to further develop and elevate students’ proficiency in Spanish using the dynamic ¡Qué Chévere! 4 text. Advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures are practiced through communicative activities within contextual themes including social justice and human rights in Latin America as well as food and cooking. Students continue to develop their communicative competence by interacting orally and in writing, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language. Additional contexts include Spanish-speaking families, communities, and traditions in the United States and other countries, technology and globalization, and education systems in the Spanish-speaking world.
  • Spanish IV Honors - Advanced Topics and Contemporary Issues in the Hispanic World

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: Spanish III Honors and/or departmental approval
    This advanced level Spanish language course is designed to further develop students’ language proficiency while preparing them for the rigor of the AP Spanish course, using the Tejidos text as a guide. We emphasize communicative activities in an immersive environment. Advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures are reviewed through the study of popular culture, the news, and history. The focus is on authentic materials highlighting cultural comparisons and connections. Students learn to exchange and support opinions verbally and in writing on a variety of topics related to Hispanic culture, historical events, and current affairs.
  • Spanish V - Aventureros: Exploring the Spanish-speaking World

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Spanish IV, Spanish IV Honors or AP Spanish Language and/or departmental approval
    In this course students explore a wide variety of themes such as Andean culture, Peruvian cuisine, poetry, feminism, the history of Afro Colombians, and controversial figures in the Spanish-speaking world. Students also participate in activities that include spending time with seniors at St. Martin de Porres Senior Citizen Center, visiting museums in DC, and more! To build on their previous years of studying Spanish, students read, write, and speak. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking countries by researching major historical and current events via reading articles, listening to podcasts, and watching authentic, award-winning films that provide unique cultural insight. Quarterly field trips in the community enhance our exploration of the Hispanic culture and history.
  • AP Spanish Language and Culture

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: Spanish IV Honors and/or departmental approval
    This advanced course is designed to engage students in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational aspects of communication in Spanish. Students analyze, reflect on, and discuss contemporary issues from throughout the Spanish-speaking world including fair trade practices, traditional medicine, cultural traditions, the effects of globalization on children, migration, and religious trends as well as lighter fare such as contemporary Latin American pop, rock, hip-hop, and rap music. Several field trips in the local community help to deepen students ́ knowledge of Hispanic culture and history. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture examination (additional fee) in May.
  • AP Spanish Literature

    Full Year - course is dependent on enrollment
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: Spanish IV Honors, AP Spanish Language, and/or departmental approval
    The course follows the syllabus published by the College Board AP program. Students study the entire AP Spanish Literature reading list from the medieval period to the present day. The works are presented by topic with the aim of integrating the historical themes and literary movements of the different time periods, and highlighting the schools of literature to which each piece belongs as well as the author’s style and the characteristics of each selection. The two-semester course and its activities are intended to teach and enhance a student’s ability to acquire, identify, understand, discuss, interpret and analyze the form and content of literary works of prose, poetry and drama along with the literary terms and conceptual aspects of art and history of the time. The lessons are designed to help students interpret the figures of speech, tone, genre, style, characters, themes, and literary symbols in an effort to develop their analytical and interpretative skills. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Literature examination (additional fee) in May.
  • Advanced Spanish Literature and Culture: 20th Century Hispanic Literature and History

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisites: AP Spanish Language and Culture, and/or departmental approval
    This honors course is designed for students who have completed AP 20 Spanish Language and Culture. In this advanced literature and history course, students will engage in literary analysis within the socio-historical context of 20th century Latin America and Spain. Students are expected to write a series of argumentative essays that will prepare them for producing an end of semester presentation and paper. Students will learn about the 1920’s Latin American avant-garde movements, the “generación del 27” in Spain, Jorge Luis Borges’ short stories from the 40’s and 50’s, the “boom” of the Latin American novel of the 60’s, the political literature written during the 70’s in the context of the military dictatorships, and the literary works and films produced at the end of the century amid the socio-economic crisis of the 90’s.
  • Latin I - Foundations

    Full Year
    1 credit
    This course provides an introduction to the Latin language. Students read about an Ancient Roman family’s life in the city while learning core vocabulary and grammar. Through their reading and study of Latin vocabulary, students will also explore English derivatives from Latin roots. By the end of this course, students will be able to translate or comprehend stories and passages in Latin. Students also gain an overview of classical mythology, Roman history, daily life, and the geography of the ancient world.
  • Latin II

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: MS Latin 8 or Latin I and departmental approval
    In this course, students continue to develop the skills of reading and grammatical analysis that they began in Latin I. The course continues the introduction to Latin grammar with emphasis on the remaining inflectional forms, the syntax of verbs, complex sentences, and vocabulary. Students explore the continuation and rich history of Latin as a post-Roman language that spans millennia. The course includes further study of Roman culture, history, and mythology. 
  • Latin II Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: MS Latin 8 or Latin I and departmental approval
    In this course, students continue to develop the skills of reading and grammatical analysis that they began in Latin I. Students are expected to be self-monitoring and self-motivated learners, as they expand their skills through studying new morphology and reading extensively. The course continues the introduction to Latin grammar with emphasis on the remaining inflectional forms, the syntax of verbs, complex sentences, and vocabulary. Students explore the continuation and rich history of Latin as a post-Roman language that spans millennia. The course includes further study of Roman culture, history, and mythology. 
  • Latin III

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Latin II or Latin II Honors and/or departmental approval
    In this course, students review language structures from earlier levels and continue reading in Latin to build grammar skills, vocabulary, and derivatives. Students employ their language and translation skills as a vehicle to learn Roman history and mythology, while also exploring foundational stories of European art and literature. The study of grammar culminates in an introduction to readings based on selections from authentic Latin prose authors, such as Eutropius’ Breviarium Historiae Romanae and Hyginus’ Fabulae.
  • Latin III Honors

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Latin II or Latin II honors and/or departmental approval
    This course assumes facility with all Latin II skills. Students are expected to be self-monitoring and selfmotivated learners, as they expand their skills through studying new morphology and reading extensively. Students employ their language and translation skills as a vehicle to learn Roman history and mythology, while also exploring foundational stories of European art and literature. The study of grammar culminates in an introduction to readings based on selections from authentic Latin prose authors, such as Eutropius’ Breviarium Historiae Romanae and Hyginus’ Fabulae.
  • Latin IV - The Roman World (Part 1)

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Latin III or Latin III honors and/or departmental approval
    Students in this course read prose and poetry from various eras of Latin literature in order to gain a deeper appreciation of Roman culture and history through primary sources. Students read authors such as Eutropius and Caesar to study Roman history, the Vulgate and Catullus to study peoples of the ancient world, and Hyginus and Ovid to study mythology. The emphasis of this course is placed on developing a critical understanding of and an appreciation for the ancient world through reading in Latin.
  • Latin IV Honors - Introduction to Latin Literature

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Latin III or Latin III Honors and departmental approval
    Students in this course read and 21 analyze prose and poetry from various eras of Latin literature in order to gain a deeper appreciation of Latin style and structure as well as Roman culture and history. Students focus on the structure, meter, and interpretation of poems from such poets as Catullus, Vergil, and Ovid. They also focus on analyzing the style and historical significance of prose authors such as Caesar, Cicero, Livy, and others. The emphasis of this course is placed on developing a critical understanding of and an appreciation for the artistic merits of Latin literature in all its forms. Students are expected to be selfmonitoring and self-motivated learners, as they expand their skills through observing literary style and reading extensively. 
  • Latin V - The Roman World (Part 2)

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Latin IV or Latin IV Honors and/or departmental approval
    Students in this course continue to read prose and poetry from various eras of Latin literature in order to gain a deeper appreciation of Roman culture and history through primary sources. Through analyzing texts read in class, students will further explore the ways that cultural bias, historical context, and literary style influence the way that stories are presented. Students read authors such as Eutropius and Livy to study Roman history, Martial and Catullus to study peoples of the ancient world, and Vergil and Ovid to study mythology. The emphasis of this course is placed on developing a critical understanding of and an appreciation for the ancient world through reading in Latin.
  • AP Latin - Caesar and Vergil

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Latin IV Honors and departmental approval
    The course follows the syllabus published by the College Board AP program and is intended to prepare the student to take the AP exam on Caesar and Vergil. Students read in Latin and in English substantial portions of Caesar’s Commentarii De Bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid. Class discussions and writing assignments encourage students to consider the value of each text with respect to its literary program, literary models, cultural influence, and historical context. While some time is spent on grammatical and syntactical analysis, we focus on the seven AP themes of literary style and genre, Roman values, war and empire, leadership, views of non-Romans, history and memory, and human beings and the gods. Students practice reading Latin at sight, exploring content, themes, and literary style.
  • China: Confucius to Mao

    One semester
    ½ credit
    This course will survey the major intellectual trends that shape Chinese culture and history, focusing on China’s most influential thinkers, including Confucius, Mencius, Laozi, Zhuangzi, and Mao. We will also explore the intersection of these trends with the Chinese language, particularly through the written characters.
  • Classical Mythology and the Modern World

    One semester
    ½ credit
    Mythology encompasses the stories that capture the imagination of a society. This course will focus on the mythology of Ancient Greece and Rome, including stories of heroes, monsters, powers and origins of gods, coming of age, and transformations. The course will also explore ways in which modern “mythology” of adventurers and superheroes derives symbolism, structures, and archetypes from Greek and Roman mythology. Students will not only learn the stories themselves, but also develop the skills to analyze common patterns and themes in ancient and modern myths.
  • Chinese Language and Culture V

    Full Year
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: Chinese Language and Culture IV and/or departmental approval Chinese V Honors is conducted entirely in Chinese, and focuses on engaging with authentic materials at a sophisticated level. Content is grouped by theme, and students are encouraged within a thematic unit to pursue their own interests and find content that interests them. Such content may include, but is not limited to, newspaper articles, youtube videos, popular songs, etc. Class participation plays a major role in this course, as classroom conversation is conducted in the spirit of the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interviews, in which students are asked to remain on a topic and continually deepen the sophistication of the discussion as it proceeds.

Department Faculty

  • Photo of Fay Slattery
    Fay Slattery
    Chair of the Modern and Classical Languages Department and Upper School Spanish Teacher
    703-212-2917
    Allegheny College, Meadville, PA - B.A.
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C. - M.A.
  • Photo of Sebastian Bartis
    Sebastian Bartis
    Upper School Language Teacher (Spanish)
    703-212-2764
    University of Buenos Aires - B.A.
    University of Maryland, College Park - Ph.D.
  • Photo of Christine Gasper
    Christine Gasper
    Upper School Language Teacher (Spanish)
    703-212-2954
    Saint Louis University - M.A
    Marywood University - B.A.
  • Photo of Jayson Gilbert
    Jayson Gilbert
    Upper School Language Teacher (Spanish)
    703-212-2862
    College of Charleston, Charleston, SC - BS
    School for International Training Graduate Institute - MA
  • Photo of Sebastian Gluzman
    Sebastian Gluzman
    Upper School Language Teacher (Spanish)
    703-212-2710
    SMU - Master in Bilingual and Gifted and Talented Education
    Universidad Austral (Buenos Aires, Argentina) - Licenciado en Comunicación Social
  • Photo of Kevin Jefferson
    Kevin Jefferson
    Language Teacher
    703-212-2913
    University of Virginia - B.A.
    University of Colorado Boulder - M.A.
  • Photo of Daniel Lowinger
    Daniel Lowinger
    Middle and Upper School Language Teacher (Mandarin)
    703-212-2294
    Amherst College - B.A.
  • Photo of Allanah Nash-Denis
    Allanah Nash-Denis
    Upper School Language Teacher (Spanish)
    703-212-2797
    Delaware State University - B.A. of Arts
  • Photo of Alexander Robinson
    Alexander Robinson
    Upper School Language Teacher (Latin)
    703-212-2795
    Tulane University - Juris Doctor
    Catholic University of America - Master of Arts
    University of the South (Sewanee) - B.A.
  • Photo of Kimberly Scott
    Kimberly Scott
    Upper School Language Teacher (French)
    (703) 212-2915
    Eastern Connecticut State University, Willimantic, CT - B.A.
    George Mason University, Fairfax, VA - M.A.
  • Photo of Jamie Segraves
    Jamie Segraves
    Associate Director of Upper School and Spanish teacher
    703-212-2744
    The University of Texas at Austin - B.A.
    Middlebury College - M.A.
    Georgetown University - M.S.
    Seton Hall University - Ed.D.
  • Photo of Vonnique Van Way
    Vonnique Van Way
    Upper School Language Teacher (French)
    703-212-2786
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA - M.A.
    Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. - B.S.
Age 3-Grade 12 coed Episcopal day school in Alexandria, Virginia

Campuses

List of 3 items.

  • Lower School

    Age 3-Grade 5
    400 Fontaine Street
    Alexandria, Virginia 22302
  • Middle School

    Grades: 6-8
    4401 West Braddock Road
    Alexandria, Virginia 22304
  • Upper School

    Grades: 9-12
    1000 St. Stephen's Road
    Alexandria, Virginia 22304